Who Is Responsible When Skiers Collide?

3D illustration hip painful skeleton x-ray medical concept.

To say that Colorado is the skiing capital of the United States is no exaggeration. People come from all across the nation—and from around the world—to experience the slopes of our mountains. However, with so many people coming to Colorado to participate in a physically demanding sport, incidents are bound to happen. So, when skiers collide, it is often up to our state’s laws to sort out the ensuing mess.

When Skiers Collide, Who Is Responsible for Subsequent Injuries?

It was March of the 2016 skiing season when a doctor from Cincinnati, Ohio was enjoying the slopes of Keystone Resort. The doctor was on the Frenchman run when he was suddenly struck from behind by another skier moving at a high rate of speed. The crash caused some serious damage, forcing the doctor to undergo two surgeries. He also sustained a torn ACL, torn medial and lateral meniscuses, and micro fractures to his tibia.

Due to these injuries, the doctor has filed a lawsuit against the Texas man who collided with him. The doctor claims that the other skier was negligent, overestimating his own skill and failing to avoid other people who were skiing below him. He also believes that Colorado law is on his side, proving that the Texan is liable for the crash. The lawsuit is asking for $300,000 in damages.

Cases like these are not uncommon in Colorado, especially considering that our state is the epicenter of winter sport in the U.S. However, it is important to understand the intricacies of Colorado law if a victim plans to pursue compensation for their pain and loss. This case was just filed on March 3rd, two years after the doctor was injured. This is very important, considering that our state has a two-year statute of limitation when it comes to filing injury cases like this.

Want to learn more about Colorado law, and how an experienced local attorney can help? Keep following our blog to find out how Metier Law Firm can provide you with comfort, safety and strength.



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